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A frame from a beehive at a cherry farm near Young, New South Wales.

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About one third of all food is produced as a result of insect pollination, and the European honeybee, Apis mellifera, is responsible for about 80% of this. In Australia, farmers rely on large populations of feral European honeybees (managed bees gone wild).

The European honeybee is under threat The Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, poses a significant threat to these populations as it is a host to two types of predatory mites with the capacity to wipe out huge numbers of the European honeybee – the varroa mite (Varroa destructor) and the Asian bee mite (Tropilaelaps clareae).

Dr Anderson is currently using molecular and physical methods to investigate the ecology, epidemiology, invasiveness, co-evolution and control of exotic parasitic bee mites and their Asian honeybee hosts.

Photographer : Nick Pitsas

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<table style="border:1px solid;padding:2px; width:310px;" ><tr><td><a href="http://scienceimage.csiro.au/image/6586/"><img src="http://scienceimage.csiro.au/images/embed/300_0_EM7004.jpg" width="300" alt="A frame from a beehive at a cherry farm near Young, New South Wales." style="margin: 0 0 5px 0; border: 0px;"></a><br/><a href="http://scienceimage.csiro.au/image/6586/">A frame from a beehive at a cherry farm near Young, New South Wales.</a><br />by CSIRO</td></tr></table>
A frame from a beehive at a cherry farm near Young, New South Wales.
A frame from a beehive at a cherry farm near Young, New South Wales.
by CSIRO

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